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Thread: TF999 good or bad

  1. #1

    Default TF999 good or bad

    Hi folks anyone got an opinion on the 999 box? My latest acquisition CJ8 has one and it's in the shop right now. The vehicle will go to the beaches north of Perth Western Australia and probably will never see a workshop again so I want to get it right before it goes up there. So far it has a cracked yolk in the torque converter and badly worn clutches. Should be good tuff little box after this rebuild right?
    Gazzo.

  2. #2
    Senior Moderator CJSIXER's Avatar
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    The 999 is fine for 6 cylinder power. I know plenty of folks who have run them for years with few problems.

    1970 CJ-6: 305 TPI V8, NV4500, Dana 18 w/Teralow 3:15 gears, Dana 44 rear w/Detroit, 4:88s and custom Moser Alloy shafts, Dana 30 front w/4:88s and Bid Daddy OR HD Tierod kit flipped on top of the knuckles, full cage tied in with Saginaw power steering conversion and power brake conversion. 35 inch Super Swamper SSRs on 17x9 Procomp Steel Wheels. Kilby On Board Air---
    2000 XJ Cherokee Sport - Traded the old girl in on a 2011 Dodge Ram 1500 so I could tow the CJ to and from the trail. Only one Jeep in the family these days.

  3. #3

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    I have to agree, I've pounded the crap out of them behind small, low power V-8's and have had very few issues with them.
    The only thing I don't do is tow with them, they get REALLY hot when you tow something large with them.
    An additional trans cooler is always a good idea, same as any automatic you are going to lug hard on.

    While it's apart, have that plastic check valve replaced with the $1 metal version...
    When that plastic check valve gives up, the clutches/valve body drain, and you will sit waiting for it to get fluid to accumulators and everything else again before it will move.

    Once you get moving, it's fine, but if you let it sit a while, it will drain back again...

    Learn to do basic band and throttle valve adjustments yourself,
    They aren't hard to do, and if you keep up on them, the transmission will last MUCH longer.
    There are two bands, one adjustment in the pan, one outside the case, and the throttle valve adjustment is on the linkage.
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  4. #4
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    I've run mine behind a mild 360 V-8 for years, it's held up just fine.
    John N
    1981 Scrambler Dana 44's w/ARBs F & R, AMC 360 w/TBI, TF999, Dana 300 clocked & twin sticked w/4:1, RE 4.5" XD lift, etc........
    Plus.... 2 Grand Cherokees 2008 Overland (DD), 2002 (sons), CJ-7 (in pieces) and 3 off brand 4x4s...

  5. #5

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    Yeah, the 'Horror Stories' that came out of 'pIRATE 4x4' really scared the hell out of people.
    I've seen NONE if that with the three or four I've run.

    DIRT cheap and simple to rebuild, works like a plow horse, good road manners, light weight, bolts to an AMC block without a $1,500 adapter...

    They are easy to find, reasonable priced when you find them, and easy to service yourself at home when you change fluid/filter.

    I COULD worry about this or that, but they've not given me a reason to.
    Like everything else, they have a couple of things you CAN change if you want to, and a couple of things you should change when you rebuild,
    But they aren't nearly as trouble prone as say a TH400 in a CJ application.

    The only real difference in cost besides using heavy duty clutch packs and bands is that darn check valve, and it's $1, takes 30 seconds to change when you have it torn down, then I can't complain about anything!
    (and trust me, if there was something to complain about, I WOULD!)

    The only issue I have is my 727 clutch compressor won't fit inside the smaller clutch drums...
    I can live with that, took about half an hour to make a compressor shoe for my press,
    Now I'm set up!
    REMEMBER!
    Information you got for free off the internet is worth EXACTLY what you paid for it!
    ----------------
    I used to be TeamRush, but I'm much better with medication...

  6. #6

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    Wow, nice responses thanks folks. Too late to add the non plastic check valve though. I was away in the desert for the day and the dudes in the shop put it back together and back in the vehicle this arvo. They said on the phone it drives super sweet. Guess I'll find out tomorrow morning. Going to be doing very low yearly miles so it will probably outlast the body which will fall off in about 5 years I reckon, due to the seaside environment there. I'll ask them about the check valve. Thanks again all.
    Gazzo.

  7. #7
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    Now that you've had the transmission rebuilt and reinstalled it's time to think about a few things:

    • It's too late, but think about vent relocation, water is the 999's enemy.
    • Maybe think about getting a new TC - with a different than OEM Stall speed.
    • After ANY water crossing, drain and refill the ATF, or likely you'll be doing another rebuild.
    • Ask the rebuilder if he left the magnet in the ATF pan, if not, put one in.
    • Get an over-sized ATF pan.
    • Change the ATF every 20K to 25K miles. The ATF conditions the clutch pack disk material. If you don't do this and change it at, say, 150K miles, be prepared to do a rebuild
    • Install an ATF cooler, and
    • maybe even an external ATF filter (yes, I know there's one affixed to the Valvebody).
    Pick up another used transmission, an ATSG manual and a rebuild kit and learn to rebuild it... then put it on the shelf for next time. There will be a next time. Then you're only a day away (R&R) from having the Jeep back on the road if there's a transmission failure. It's cheap insurance.

  8. #8

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    Yup, all good stuff LEVE,
    I completely forgot to mention the vent, which is an automatic for me when I'm doing one for a Jeep...

    Plug the factory vent in the bell housing, drill a hole in the case at a thick spot, screw in a line nipple fitting and you are off to the races with a vent you can put above the water line!

    What the factory vent, you don't have to sink the transmission, the torque converter in the water will deliver plenty of water to the vent inside the bell housing,
    And the water cooling the case will create 'Suction' as it contracts...

    If you have a deep pan and it has a drain plug, use a magnetic plug instead of a magnet in the pan, that way you can remove the metal during inspections you Don't take the pan off.

    When I use a remote filter, I stick a magnet to the bottom of the filter,
    I don't know if it does any good, but magnets are cheap and it makes me feel better about things...

    If you go with a deep pan, and you plan to tilt the transmssion pretty good, then think about extending the filter/sump lower in the pan.
    Deep pans will uncover the sump just as fast as the shallow ones if you don't get the sump down in the Fluid.

    Deep pans present a lot more surface area, and the fluid has longer to sit and cool down before it gets back to work,
    But deep pans are sometimes hard to clear with linkages and skid plates...
    REMEMBER!
    Information you got for free off the internet is worth EXACTLY what you paid for it!
    ----------------
    I used to be TeamRush, but I'm much better with medication...

  9. #9

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    Vehicle back from transmission guy and goes like a champion, well pretty good anyway. Asked about the check valve, no dice, original one was "OK". Plates were cactus. Torque converter had a cracked yolk, replaced it. Pretty happy all up really, I'll keep an eye out though for the tune up tips from you guys. Thanks.
    Here's the "Overlander" when I picked it up. Bit too much tin for my liking.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Gazzo.

  10. #10
    Senior Moderator CJSIXER's Avatar
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    I really like the hard top on the Overlanders but then again it is because we do not have them here. There are likely less than a dozen of those tops in this country. I know of several folks who have them but they are still very rare in the US. The "World Cab" hardtops were sold in several markets including Venezeula and Austrailia. There was a CJ-7 version as well and the half cab for the CJ-10.

    1970 CJ-6: 305 TPI V8, NV4500, Dana 18 w/Teralow 3:15 gears, Dana 44 rear w/Detroit, 4:88s and custom Moser Alloy shafts, Dana 30 front w/4:88s and Bid Daddy OR HD Tierod kit flipped on top of the knuckles, full cage tied in with Saginaw power steering conversion and power brake conversion. 35 inch Super Swamper SSRs on 17x9 Procomp Steel Wheels. Kilby On Board Air---
    2000 XJ Cherokee Sport - Traded the old girl in on a 2011 Dodge Ram 1500 so I could tow the CJ to and from the trail. Only one Jeep in the family these days.

  11. #11

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    hey guys,

    new to this forum.

    I have a 1987 yj with 4.2 I6, automatic TF999 transmission. I use it for tame offroad stuff, such as dirt roads, wood trails, hunting trails, occasional mud or water hole.

    The transmission is being rebuilt right now. What do I need to ask them to do?

    From above, I gathered that I should use the metal check valve, magnetic plug, and move the vent.

    Any other suggestions?

    How do I tell them how to move the vent? They are already being hesitant, so I need to tell them exactly how to do it.

    Thanks so much!

  12. #12
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    This is one method I used:

    TF999 Vent Relocate

    There are others, such as threading the vent hole and inserting an allen head plug. There's also Jeepers that snake a small copper tube from the present vent, up behind the TC and out the top of the case to a hose.

    Copper tube venting

    Pick your poison!

  13. #13

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    Thanks. That's awesome.

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