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Thread: Grand Cherokee 96 battery drain

  1. #1

    Icon316 Grand Cherokee 96 battery drain

    Hello! I have terrible battery drain on my 1996 Grand Cherokee. Full battery drains completely by one night! To stop it, I need to pull out fuse #16 - cabin light and one big fuse in the middle that controls DDM and PDM(doors and windows). Only then battery stops to drain. What could be wrong? Electrician checked my alarm system, everything is ok. Any ideas? Do I need to change DDM?
    Thank you. Sorry for my English

  2. #2

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    Its probably safe to say you most defenitly have a short. I would probably start by checking the wires inside your door boots.

  3. #3

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    Yesterday my electrician opened door panels and in each door was a little box, he said that this is "Auto closing windows alarm"(I didn't installed it), he checked it, it wasn't working (door fuse was in). He deleted that box and connected all wires like they should, but battery still drains =(
    All wires look normal and isolated

  4. #4

    Icon316

    you need to TEST not look

  5. #5

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    could you please tell me how?

  6. #6

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    It's hard to explain every test procedure in a forum. But i would probably start by unhooking your battery both - and + terminels clip multi meter leads onto your battery wires (not your battery). set your meter to check resistance (or ohm's). your ohm's will fluctuate and your meter will go crazy at first but the numbers will slow down, when your meter has kinda stabilized have someone watch the reading on your meter while you go and start moving wires around when the meter starts falling or rising rather quickly (depending on if it's an open or a short) you found the general location of your short. I hope this helps you a little.But first i would check the draw on your battery with the ignition off to make sure it's not your battery

  7. #7

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    ok I will try to do this.
    I made ignition draw test, but it was 3 months ago so I cant remember how much was on multimeter
    Thank you!

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by WSAR10 View Post
    It's hard to explain every test procedure in a forum. But i would probably start by unhooking your battery both - and + terminels clip multi meter leads onto your battery wires (not your battery). set your meter to check resistance (or ohm's).
    I agree that a multimeter is best, but ohms is not the best way to find the problem, it will only find resistive loads like lights, and won't find drain from solid state devices (alarm, radio, PCM, sensors, various modules, relays, etc) and won't tell you the actual current drain.

    Instead, use the current setting (amps), even my cheap HF unit does 10 amps. To connect it, you unhook one lead of the battery, connect one probe to the battery terminal and one to the battery wire you disconnected. Now you will get the actual current draw. It should be no more than about 0.05 amps (50 ma).

    Just don't start the Jeep or turn on headlights or anything like that, and if you need to open doors, tape the door button down so your interior lights stay off.

  9. #9
    Registered guthycs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by twojeeps View Post
    I agree that a multimeter is best, but ohms is not the best way to find the problem, it will only find resistive loads like lights, and won't find drain from solid state devices (alarm, radio, PCM, sensors, various modules, relays, etc) and won't tell you the actual current drain.

    Instead, use the current setting (amps), even my cheap HF unit does 10 amps. To connect it, you unhook one lead of the battery, connect one probe to the battery terminal and one to the battery wire you disconnected. Now you will get the actual current draw. It should be no more than about 0.05 amps (50 ma).

    Just don't start the Jeep or turn on headlights or anything like that, and if you need to open doors, tape the door button down so your interior lights stay off.
    x2. never heard of tracking down a short/current drain issue by measuring resistance. Maybe 30 years ago you could have done that. Most of the electronics is controlled by the BCM in your Jeep.
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  10. #10

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    My 94 ZJ did the same thing a few years ago. It kept draining my battery and I had to replace the battery several times. Dealer and mechanic could not find any problem and blamed it on cheap faulty battery (bought at Costco, so replaced under warranty). Anyways, one day I noticed that the darn underhood light in the engine compartment remained on while the hood was fully closed. Must be faulty switch. I just removed the bulb. I haven't had a problem since.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by twojeeps View Post
    I agree that a multimeter is best, but ohms is not the best way to find the problem, it will only find resistive loads like lights, and won't find drain from solid state devices (alarm, radio, PCM, sensors, various modules, relays, etc) and won't tell you the actual current drain.

    Instead, use the current setting (amps), even my cheap HF unit does 10 amps. To connect it, you unhook one lead of the battery, connect one probe to the battery terminal and one to the battery wire you disconnected. Now you will get the actual current draw. It should be no more than about 0.05 amps (50 ma).

    Just don't start the Jeep or turn on headlights or anything like that, and if you need to open doors, tape the door button down so your interior lights stay off.
    All this procedure is going to do is tell you how much current you have drawing on your battery with the ignition off, You already know that you are drawing enough current to drain your battery overnite. but that is one way to be sure that you have a short. I have (or maybe after today had) a problem with blowing my dome light fuse, My fuse would only blow when my dome and other lamps would "time out" after i shut my doors or locked my doors or started my engine, which is weird alot of times fuse blow powering up not shuting down. I'm not sure if i fixed the problem but tonite i replaced the relay on the timer circut for my int. lights, It kinda seemed like that relay may have had a minor "flicker" or maybe a short across a diode inside of it. I'm not real sure i didnt test or take the relay apart due too lack of time. Or maybe i'm wrong and it's another problem. Has anybody else had any issues like this?

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