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Thread: Rear Bumper Clevis Mounts Vs. Hitch Mounted Shackle Bracket

  1. #1

    Default Rear Bumper Clevis Mounts Vs. Hitch Mounted Shackle Bracket

    I'm thinking about getting a new bumper with a built in hitch to replace the stock one. It's function will be to protect the Jeep and to provide a place to mount accessories, like a cargo tray.

    Would I regret not getting clevis mounts on the bumper. I was planning on just leaving the hitch pin in the hitch to use with a tow strap and I have a rear tow hook bolted to the frame of my Jeep (like on Stu Olsen's website). Also, I figure if I really want a D-ring, I could just get the Warn shackle bracket. Are there any cons not getting clevis mounts?

    Basically, I don't want to regret my purchase. Not ordering clevis mounts would shave some $$$ off of the bumper, but I really want to do right the first time. Please advise.
    2002 Wrangler X(My Jeep)

    31" BFG AT's, Front and Rear Tow Hooks, Mirror Relocators, Skid Row Steering Box Skid, (for now...)

  2. #2
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    I like my clevis mounts. Easily to put the strap on with the shackles, plus you can vary the pull angle by using either mount. However a receiver shackle mount would work just as well. I'd say it comes down to personal preference.
    2004 Black Rubicon w/ 5 spd

    RE 3.5 SuperFlex & Front Trackbar / JKS 1.25" BL & MML / 35x12.5 MTRs on 15x8 AR-23s / Currie Anti-Rock / Jeeperman Bumpers / Rokmen Sliders / York OBA / Harbor Freight 8k Winch

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    Registered PurpleTJ's Avatar
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    You can put a larger clevis mount on your bumper and use a bulkier tow rope with less priblems. Also I have seen people use the clevis' on each side as tie downs for highway trips... I say get the clevis mounts. That way you have either as an option.
    Jeff Niwa
    98 TJ Sport, Trac Loc, 3" Teraflex System, 1" BL, 33x12.5 Stampeder MTs on AR767's. BFG AT KO's, Tomken Gas Skid, California Soft Top, Bosch H4 headlight upgrades w/ 55/65watt bulbs + all sorts of other lighting, tow strap, first aid kit, Durabaked interior, Cobra 75 CB w/ 5' Wilson Antenna, Rusty Oil Pan skid, Husky floor liners, hand throttle,and fire extinguisher.
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    I have the rear clevis mounts with D-rings and the rear hitch with a hook type arrangement that plugs into the hitch. To be frank, I never bother with the D-rings as its so much easier to just drop the tow strap over the hook in the hitch. From experience I would advise against relying on the hitch pin tow strap deal as you can only use a 2" tow strap and its a pain working it into the hitch as opposed to dropping it over the hook. I wouldnt mount a tow hook to the frame as it will interfer with your clearance somewhat. As a previous poster said, the only use one really would have for the D-rings is as a tie down location IMHO. john

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    I don't see any need for a clevis in the rear. You can use your tow hook or the hitch for a tie down -- or even throw a loop around the bumper. Don't know your style of 'wheeling or which bumper you're looking at, but I'd get one rated for towing, even if you don't have a need for it right now. Also, make sure the receiver is set up high enough into the bumper that it won't drag over obticles. I bought my bumper from kind-of a local guy (Burnsville Off Road -- 200 miles south of here). While it's a good solid bumper, the receiver is inset into the bumper only part way up from the bottom. Needless to say, I end up dragging it pretty good sometimes. If it was set into the middle of the bumper it wouldn't be an issue. Son-in-law welded me up a little skidplate for it with a hole for a big d-ring that slips into the receiver. Extremely stout, but there goes another inch of clearance. Well, that dragging back there is just noise, anyway! Pic of the receiver -- some bumpers (Tomkin) are even worse:
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    Joel

    '97 TJ 5.7 Hemi, 545RFE, Iron Y front long arms, WJ cross over steering & brakes, F&R Truetracs, 4.56s, 8.8, 2 1/2" OME, 295/75R-16 BFG ATs, HS9500i, TummyTuck.
    '07 Commander Overland

  6. #6
    I wanna 60 for the front JohnDF's Avatar
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    Depends on the bumper. Some clevis mounts are not that strong. Your call.

    The Warn shackle is a nice option. I've used mine a bunch of times to tug people out. Very strong.

    I'd stay away from using your hitch pin. It's a pain to use and angled pulls will start cutting into your strap.

    I use the stock hook the most. It does take up some departure angle but it is very strong and will take a good beating. It is the easiest and quickest to use though.

    Mounting a hook to your frame is also a good idea.

    Lots of options and personal preference is the deciding facter.

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    IMHO, the advantage of having the clevis mounts (beside those already mentioned) are putting a clevis or 2 on them and then you don't have to carry a Warn solid steel 2" clevis mount with you - obviously, this assumes you are in need of your hitch for something else on your way to the trail. I see it as one less thing to carry!

  8. #8

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    While the tow hook on the frame is a reasonable option, it is mounted with two bolts. My bumper is mounted to the frame with 14 bolts.

    I like the recovery options of having the hitch and the two cleavis shackles. I pulled a kid's Buick off the road last week. The only way I could hook him up was to wrap the strap around his frame and attach to my two shackles.



    The tow-rated angle is overrated by my estimate. Get a solid hitch that is welded through on both sides. There's no way you can tow enough with a Wrangler to worry about the hitch. Think about it, if they say it's rated for 10,000 pounds for recovery, is two-rated really all that important?


    Tim
    Phoenix AZ

    2004 Wrangler Unlimited, 4.0L auto, 4" Teraflex lift, 33x12.50x15 TrXus STS tires on MT Classic II wheels, Shrockworks Rocksliders, KOZ Offroad rear bumper, Bestop soft half doors

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    Quote Originally Posted by treeofliberty
    Think about it, if they say it's rated for 10,000 pounds for recovery, is two-rated really all that important?
    Well, ya it is, for two reasons. Lets take the Currie bumper for example. It's a good heavy duty bumper with a solid receiver. It's not tow rated and therefore is has no provision for hooking up safety chains. I think most non-rated bumpers are like that. Not that you couldn't weld up loops for safety chains yourself, but now you're messing up that nice powder coat finish. Good luck getting rattle can paint to last during MN winters! Second reason is the square tubing size. If regular 2" ID tubing is used, it's a real sloppy fit when you slide your hitch into it. No big deal if you're not using it for towing. If your bumper is rated for towing, you know they're going to be using regular receiver hitch stock, plus there's that re-inforcing ring around the receiver opening to strengthen the hitch -- not everyone has that (but maybe those are just the home made ones).

    I think the main reason some bumpers are not tow rated is simply because of liability. Actually my bumper isn't "rated", but it's certainly strong enough for towing.

    There's my last two cents on the subject.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by treeofliberty
    ..There's no way you can tow enough with a Wrangler to worry about the hitch. Think about it, if they say it's rated for 10,000 pounds for recovery, is two-rated really all that important?
    I agree, tow ratings ARE a liability, requiring manufacturers to have more (expensive) insurance. Hopefully most people wont tow over the Jeeps weight capability on the road.

    You WILL pull more then the 2000lbs when recovering someone. Just the weight of the Jeep is well over 4000lbs, add to that the resistance of being stuck. It wouldnt take too much to get up to 10000lbs. My Jeep has also, on multiple occasions, had to tow someone off the trail. Often over obstacles that took the power of the Jeep being towed (with lockers) to get through.

    Whos rating the the shackles and/or hitch for 10,000 lbs? I havent heard of anyone doing that.

    Tam

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    Speaking only of the hitch (shackles probably are not so strong even being welded front and rear <and I wouldnt suggest using as a tow strap point if they were not>, the quality rear bumpers are not only bolted to the cross member but have tie ins to the frame as well. The Hitch being slighly over 2" on each of 4 sides is welded to that bumper front and rear (8 Welds). I think its safe to say its at least as strong as one tow hook bolted to the frame. john

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joel
    Well, ya it is, for two reasons. Lets take the Currie bumper for example. It's a good heavy duty bumper with a solid receiver. It's not tow rated and therefore is has no provision for hooking up safety chains. I think most non-rated bumpers are like that. Not that you couldn't weld up loops for safety chains yourself, but now you're messing up that nice powder coat finish. Good luck getting rattle can paint to last during MN winters! Second reason is the square tubing size. If regular 2" ID tubing is used, it's a real sloppy fit when you slide your hitch into it. No big deal if you're not using it for towing. If your bumper is rated for towing, you know they're going to be using regular receiver hitch stock, plus there's that re-inforcing ring around the receiver opening to strengthen the hitch -- not everyone has that (but maybe those are just the home made ones).

    I think the main reason some bumpers are not tow rated is simply because of liability. Actually my bumper isn't "rated", but it's certainly strong enough for towing.

    There's my last two cents on the subject.

    My KOZ is not tow-rated but it has hookups for safety chains.


    Tim
    Phoenix AZ

    2004 Wrangler Unlimited, 4.0L auto, 4" Teraflex lift, 33x12.50x15 TrXus STS tires on MT Classic II wheels, Shrockworks Rocksliders, KOZ Offroad rear bumper, Bestop soft half doors

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    You don't say what bumper you are looking at. My last TJ had the double tube bumpers and I got the Warn receiver shackle mount. I now have Bullet Proof bumpers front and rear. They both have the shackle mounts and hitch receivers. I was looking for the most versatile set-up. Depending on the situation I end up in, I have several options for recovery or tie down.
    As noted, some bumpers are not as stout as others. The Bullet Proof bumpers are almost bomb-proof, however; you pay for it in weight and Yankee Dollars.

    You need to evaluate your wheeling style and budget. If you can afford to drop $700 on a bumper and don't care that it weighs over 100 lbs, then get a Bullet Proof bumper. Otherwise, get one that matches your budget and wheeling style.

    The Warn receiver shackle mount is the most economical choice and can be transferred to any vehicle with a 2" receiver.

    Also, the hooks are convienent (I have a one for my front receiver); but the strap could slip off in a tricky recovery. The shackle is the most secure.
    04 Rubicon, Henry Ford edition-BLACK
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