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Thread: Inside of brake drum rubbing on brake shoe - anyone?

  1. #1
    Registered greenlawnjeeper's Avatar
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    Default Inside of brake drum rubbing on brake shoe - anyone?

    I think this is the noise I hear when I lightly apply the brakes to a stop. I noticed the inside lip of one brake drum shiney while the other one isn't. Trouble is I cannot see anywhere on the brake shoe that is doing the rubbing. Tonight I will put one washer each on the inside of the brake drum on the studs and see if I still hear the noise. If the noise disappears, I will have to determine if the drum or brake shoe is missized. This noise came about 5 months after I did the brakes with Raybestos drums and shoes
    1996 Cherokee Country, Up-Country Suspension, Hankook LT235x15, Hella 550's, Borla Cat-Back & Magnaflow Cat, K&N, Edelbrock shocks, SSBC rotors and pads.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Inside of brake drum rubbing on brake shoe - anyone?

    -=- originally posted by greenlawnjeeper -=-
    I think this is the noise I hear when I lightly apply the brakes to a stop. I noticed the inside lip of one brake drum shiney while the other one isn't. Trouble is I cannot see anywhere on the brake shoe that is doing the rubbing.
    What's "the inside lip"?
    I consider the 'lip' of a drum to be the round flanged edge that circumscribes the backing plate.
    Do you mean the inner flat surface?

    Could be that one of the retainer springs on a shoe has loosened or broken, allowing the shoe to kinda pivot out of position and contact the drum.
    I would expect to see wear on the shoe edge, but maybe it's camoflaged with brake dust?


    Tonight I will put one washer each on the inside of the brake drum on the studs and see if I still hear the noise.....
    Please DON'T, unless you are going to use hard-to-get grade 5 steel washers, sized perfectly to the stud.

    Standard washers are so soft that you risk damage/injury using them this way.

    Good luck.
    -Rick

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    Registered greenlawnjeeper's Avatar
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    Default Re: Re: Inside of brake drum rubbing on brake shoe - anyone?

    -=- originally posted by rix85XJphx -=-
    What's "the inside lip"?
    I consider the 'lip' of a drum to be the round flanged edge that circumscribes the backing plate. Do you mean the inner flat surface?

    Could be that one of the retainer springs on a shoe has loosened or broken, allowing the shoe to kinda pivot out of position and contact the drum.
    I would expect to see wear on the shoe edge, but maybe it's camoflaged with brake dust?



    Please DON'T, unless you are going to use hard-to-get grade 5 steel washers, sized perfectly to the stud. Didn't use them when I realized that the end of the stub is slightly larger in diameter than the threaded stud - to support the drum. If I put the washer on, the drum would be supported by the threaded stud

    Standard washers are so soft that you risk damage/injury using them this way.

    Good luck.
    -Rick
    The lip is as you first described -the extreme outer circular edge of the flat inside drum. I looked again last night, and there is no shiny spot anywhere on the shoe which really stumps me:neil: And when I took it for a short ride around the block, I could only detect a slight noise. My wife uses the car so I'll ask her - the noise previously disappeared for a short time after I bled the brakes but then returned later.

    I didn't use washers on the inside of the drum because I noticed the stud is enlarged slightly at the end to help support the drum. The washer would have the drum rest on the threaded portion of the stub - which would be no good!! Thanks for your reply, Fred
    1996 Cherokee Country, Up-Country Suspension, Hankook LT235x15, Hella 550's, Borla Cat-Back & Magnaflow Cat, K&N, Edelbrock shocks, SSBC rotors and pads.

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    Registered greenlawnjeeper's Avatar
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    Default

    First off, thank all of you who replied and tried to be of assistance. I appreciate your help. As I think I mentioned, I was having trouble bleeding the Pass side rear. The fluid didn't pull out even with the manual suction bleeder gun. Gravity bleeding seemed to take forever and fluid just didn't want to flow as I thought it should. I replaced the wheel cylinder, cleaned everything up again (even though brakes were just done in January and had only about 4000 miles on them), relubed the pivot points with hi-temp lube and reassembled everything. Boy do I hate those freakin' drum brakes, who TF ever designed them? Did a road test and No noise! Just for good measure and before I forgot where everything went, I did the other side. It was either the wheel cylinder with an air lock causing pulsating or the shoes weren't "floating" on the pivot points. In any event, it's done. If that didn't do it, my next step would have been the axle shaft bearings.
    1996 Cherokee Country, Up-Country Suspension, Hankook LT235x15, Hella 550's, Borla Cat-Back & Magnaflow Cat, K&N, Edelbrock shocks, SSBC rotors and pads.

  5. #5

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    Glad you're up and running (and more importantly, stopping!! ).

    Hydraulic drum brakes evolved from mechanical drum brakes (which worked kinda like the coaster brake on a bicycle).
    They were the greatest things for cars, 'til the late '50's when lightweight aircraft disc brakes started to make their way onto race cars.
    Even into the '60's, Mercedes, Ferrari and others were still using HUGE finned drums on racers for reliability.

    When I did my first disc brake job in the late '60's (some behemouth Mopar or GM with 4 pot calipers), I realized how much simpler they were to service than drums.
    Never could understand why, through the '70's, Midas and such always charged $20 MORE per axle for discs, when they took so much less labor.

    -Rick

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