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Thread: How hard is it to replace a CV joint?

  1. #1
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    Default How hard is it to replace a CV joint?

    I was putting new brake pads on my jeep yesterday and discovered that the boot on my CV joint on the passengers side had worn out and was ripped wide open and it now makes a ticking noise when turning. Is this somthing i can replace on my own or do I have to take it somewhere to be done? I also inspected the drivers side boot it is starting to crack a little. should I completely replace both sides or can i just get a new boot put on?
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  2. #2
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    Icon316

    I've always operated under the assumption that if the CV boots are torn (and have been torn for a while) that the joints themselves are toast. Road grime, filth, dirt, mud, inexplicable nastiness can get inside, while the life-giving grease has every opportunity to escape.

    When this happened to me, I priced the joints and boots (and my time to replace them) finding that it was much more economical to get rebuilt half shafts from a local jobber. Once I got the Jeebus Nut off, it was simply a matter of sliding them in. No muss, little fuss.

    There are those on this board who recommend replacing the CV jointed shafts with U-joints. I'm not sure that I agree. If used with a fulltime transfer case (ie the 249), the CV shafts are plenty reliable, and are able to transfer power more smoothly.

    This is all my humble opinion, of course.

    bob

  3. #3
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    just to throw my 2 cents in, I think the bias towards the U joints is that they are easy to fix on the trail and elsewhere if need be. I hear if you blow a CV joint on the trail you are screwed and if you blow a U joint, its a 30 minute fix...but then again I have never had to change either, so who knows...

    Sean
    2006 Laredo WK. Silver. 4.7 with QTII. Mods planned.

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  4. #4
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    I can't stress enough that switching to U jointed shafts is not only cheap, better for the trail, but its also more economical overall.

    Ujointed shafts will last forever, you can replace the ujoint for 20 bucks if you ever need to. Which if you dont trail constantly like some of us... you probably never need to.

    CV joints never should have been used in jeeps. they claim it causes less binding, but I had my ujointed shafts in my jeep with a full time 249 without any problem whatsoever. As have many others on this board.

    Just me humble opinion.... but in the long run; it's right.

    you'll only tear another boot eventually.

  5. #5
    Victim of Circumstance HighDesertZJ's Avatar
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    Default

    They are pretty easy to replace, and only cost about $65 per side. You need to deal with the axle nut, and pull the hub/bearing assy, which I hear can be a bear, but mine came out easy. Pretty low PITA factor.

  6. #6
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    You replace them yourself if you're up to it. I think a 36mm socket and breakover bar with cheater pipe are the only "special" tools you need. A Haynes or Chilton's manual will describe the procedure well enough to get you through it even if you've never done that kind of work before.

    I recommend replacing the whole shaft on the side that's clicking. You can replace just the boot on the other side.

    Rebuilt shafts are $75 each at Pep Boys. Replacement boots are around $15 each.
    Brian
    '96 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
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  7. #7
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    On my last jeep I replaced the cv with U joint axles. Install was pretty easy. There was alot more binding in really tight turns though. I think it is a pointless battle with the cv boot because every one that I have seen has been torn. Just spend the 200 bucks and replace them with U joints.
    Hound
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  8. #8
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    Replaceing the entire CV takes 45min-1 hour after you've gone it a few times, so assumeing one carries all the spare parts they'd need on the trail, there isn't a signifigant loss because you have CV axle shafts from that angle.
    -Jonathan

    '95 ZJ Orvis 5.2L
    6.5" XJ coils up front w/UC front in rear, OME Shocks(N66L, N67L)

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